Tag Archives: agu

JOIN HICKOK COLE DESIGNERS AT DESIGNDC 2019

WASHINGTON, DC – Hickok Cole’s Joel Onorato, Jason Wright, Holly Lennihan, and Guil Almeida were selected to participate in this year’s AIA DesignDC Conference in Washington, DC from September 16 through September 18, 2019. The premier regional conference theme, Charged Up, will focus on the unique challenges facing architects, interior designers, engineers, contractors and developers in the DC metro area with a range of panels covering emerging technologies, trends, and the intersection of sustainability and design.

Joel, Jason and Holly will speak on various panels throughout the conference on subjects including the circular economy, DC building code changes, sustainable retrofitting and net zero energy. Guil will lead a guided tour of the American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC’s first commercial office building to achieve net-zero energy. 

Is the Building World Ready for the Circular Economy?

Joel Onorato, Architect and Structural Engineer

Sept. 16, 2019 at 8:30-10:00 am
Materials require large amounts of energy and finite resources during production but normally end up in landfills after demolition. This presentation will cover why it is necessary to transition to the Circular Economy where waste, material consumption and environmental impact are minimized by keeping products and materials in use in order to drastically reduce this impact.

Upcoming Changes to the DC Building Code

Jason Wright, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Associate Principal

Sept. 16, 2019 at 10:15-11:45 am
In response to the 2018 published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for the 2017 District of Columbia Construction Codes, this discussion will focus on many of the key code changes that will impact design and construction in the District, including an overview of the 2017 DC Construction Code proposed changes and include a Q+A session. Jason joins Chris Campbell, PE from Arup on the panel.

Retrofitting Existing Buildings – DC’s Sustainability Guide for Existing and Historic Properties

Holly Lennihan, LEED AP, Director of Sustainable Design

Sept. 17, 2019 at 8:45-10:15 am
This session will provide an overview of the “Sustainability Guide for Existing and Historic Properties” intended to promote and facilitate green retrofits of existing older buildings in a manner that will improve their performance and energy-efficiency while also respecting their character. Holly joins Laura Huges from EHT Traceries, Sarah Vonesh, LEED and Melanie De Cola LEED on the panel.

Coming Up: Another Way of Getting to Net Zero

Holly Lennihan, LEED AP, Director of Sustainable Design

Sept. 17, 2019 at 2:15-3:45 pm
This panel of designers and ecologist will discuss the ecology of the District, the practices that contribute to the health of our habitat, how positive impact can be measured and case studies that illustrate methods for creating health urban habitats. Holly joins Joe Chambers, ASLA from Landscape Architecture Bureau, Damien Ossi from Department of Energy and the Environment and Dr. Robert McDonald from The Nature Conservancy on the panel.

Tour: The American Geophysical Union

Guil Almeida, AIA, LEED AP, Senior Associate and Project Designer

Sept. 18, 2019 at 10:00 am-12:00 pm
During this session, participants will tour and learn about The American Geophysical Union, the first-ever net zero energy renovation of an existing commercial building in the District. The tour will highlight the unique systems installed in the building and the innovative blend of architecture and engineering.

Media Contact:
Ellie Ruggeri
917.708.0947
eruggeri@hickokcole.com

VOX–The Green New Deal aims to get buildings off fossil fuels. These 6 places have already started. The nation’s capitol has taken some incredibly ambitious steps on climate change. Last December, it passed some of the strongest clean energy requirements in the country.

DMV Net Zero Coalition

On the morning of Tuesday February 12th, 2019 Hickok Cole helped facilitate the inaugural session of the DMV Net Zero Coalition. Presented by DCRA’s Green Building Division, and Arlington and Montgomery counties, the coalition was a chance for multi-disciplinary building industry professionals from across the region to share progress on achieving deep energy savings in their buildings and share best practices in designing Net Zero structures.

With over 130 attendees, the coalition was a great success and gets us one step closer to the goal of creating a grassroots regional peer-exchange network that promotes and builds capacity for net-zero energy buildings and technologies throughout the greater Washington region. This coalition will be ever more important now that DC has mandated 100% renewable electricity sourcing for the city by 2032.

A special thanks to Dave Epley, DCRA’s Green Building Program Manager, Joan Kelsh and Jessica Abralind of Arlington’s Office of Sustainability & Environmental Management, and Lindsey Shaw, Montgomery County’s Energy & Sustainability Programs Manager for organizing this coalition kick-off. If you would like to included in future events, please contact  DMV.NZE@gmail.com.

Upcoming events:

  • Wednesday, April 3rd: Montgomery County Energy Summit at the Silver Spring Civic Building register click here.
  • Wednesday May 1st: Bisnow’s Greater DC Solar and Sustainability Summit: Why Developers Should Go Green to register click here.

To learn more about Hickok Cole’s Net Zero renovation of the American Geophysical Union’s headquarters in Dupont Circle please contact Holly Lennihan or Melanie De Cola.

Be sure to follow the latest American Geophysical Union construction updates at Building AGU.

American Geophysical Union

GREATER GREATER WASHINGTON–DC Mayor Muriel Bowser signed the most ambitious clean energy law in the nation on Friday. It requires all of DC’s electricity to come from renewable sources like wind and solar by 2032, 13 years earlier than California and Hawaii have committed to transition to 100% green electricity.

Commodity, Solar Power, and Delight

ARCHITECT MAGAZINE — Harvesting the sun’s power to create net-zero (or even net-positive) energy is cheaper than ever now. So why aren’t more architects doing it? It probably comes as no surprise that solar power is currently the least-used energy source in the United States. It has had a lot of catching up to do.

Exploring the Advanced Sustainable Building Features at American Geophysical Union

Construction is now fully underway on The American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) headquarters renovation in Dupont Circle. As part of its mission of “science for the benefit of humanity,” AGU seeks to lead by example and is striving to create the first-ever “net zero energy” renovation of an existing commercial building in the District.

In order to realize this goal, particular strategies had to be devised and technological advances realized. We would like to present just a few of them from the architects’ perspective:

Generation

Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Array
This solar PV array includes 720 solar panels making up a 250 kilowatt system. It includes 24 panels on a vertical, south-facing surface and 696 panels laid out horizontally and elevated above the penthouse roof. The panels are from manufacturer Sunpower, and at just over 22% efficiency, they are some of the most efficient on the market.

AGU's solar canopy

Reclamation

Dedicated Outdoor Air System (DOAS) with Exhaust Air Heat Recovery
The DOAS will provide a dedicated means of ventilation for the building. This system will condition the air prior to delivering it inside, while at the same time recovering the outgoing exhaust air’s heat to help raise the temperature of the incoming fresh air for space heating needs.

Hydroponic Phytoremediation (Hy Phy) Wall
While this wall looks like a standard green wall or vertical garden, it will actually work a little harder. When installed it will be an active rather than passive wall, and function as part of the building’s ventilation system. In conjunction with the DOAS, the wall will filter and improve indoor air quality, all while reducing the amount of outside air necessary. The plants, their roots, and the water filtration system will scrub air of unwanted toxins and VOCs before it recirculates throughout the building.

Absorption

Municipal Sewer Heat Exchange System
This system will tap into a combined sewer line in front of the building, which was built in the 1890s, to maximize the efficiency of the building’s mechanical systems. It will essentially function the same way a geothermal system does—as a heat sink/source—but it will be the first of its kind in the United States. The system operates by:

  1. Diverting wastewater to a settling tank located just outside of the building.
  2. Circulating the then debris-less water into a sewer heat exchanger in the underground garage.
  3. While in the garage, separately piped in radiant fluid will be pre-heated or cooled before being circulated throughout the building.

Fear not, it is a closed loop system, no sewage contamination will take place. Read more about how sewer heat exchange works here.

AGU's sewer heat exchange system

Stormwater Collection and Re-use
Rainwater will be captured from the roof and PV array and collected in a large cistern also located in the building’s garage. After filtration and treatment this greywater will be reused for all flushing fixtures and the irrigation of the green roof and hy phy wall. The cistern’s capacity is 11,300 gallons.

Reduction

Enhanced Dynamic Glazing System
The existing windows at AGU will soon be removed and replaced with dynamic glass. The curtainwall glazing will be made up of triple-pane, air-filled, 1-3/4” thick windows. The added 3rd pane gives the windows a lower U-value and solar heat gain coefficient to help reduce the transmission of heat and cold. This glazing will also utilize an electrochromic film to tint the windows on-demand. This tint twill take the place of traditional blinds as well as reduce glare and heat transmission while still allowing natural light in and views out.

electrochromic glass

DC Powered Workspace and Lighting
The US electrical grid is wired for alternating current, or AC, power distribution. However, direct current, or DC, power is used by computers, appliances, and LED lighting. Conveniently, DC power is also what will be produced by the large PV array on AGU’s roof. Creating an energy distribution microgrid which relies on direct DC to DC power will reduce the energy efficiency loss caused by power conversion.

Enhanced Envelope Insulation
The existing building envelope is brick on a CMU backup wall separated by an air gap. The exterior walls do not currently contain insulation or an air/weather barrier. 6” studs have been added along the interior of the perimeter wall which will provide space to:

  1. Install 8” of closed-cell spray-applied insulation to achieve an R-value of 53. The new insulation will also act as an air barrier.
  2. Anchor new windows which will now be in-line with the insulation, creating a continuous thermal barrier.

Radiant Ceiling Cooling System
In a radiant ceiling system temperature is controlled by radiation, a more efficient way to condition space than forced-air. Decoupling the building conditioning system from the DOAS provides the opportunity to reduce the overall energy needed to move air through the building since it’s now only needed for ventilation, not for space cooling.

radiant ceiling

“The renovation of the existing AGU headquarters provides an unprecedented opportunity to challenge ourselves to lead by example and demonstrate that we, and the Earth and space science community we represent, can be a model for sustainable design, reducing the carbon and environmental impacts of business operations in a cost-effective and replicable way.”

– American Geophysical Union

Be sure to follow the latest construction updates at Building AGU.

What do an average looking water fountain, a giant hole in the ground, and a truck full of what used to be poop all have in common?